Trademark Services

The group at RBS of knowledgeable and experienced trademark agents and lawyers manage all aspects of trademark portfolios in Canada, the USA, and around the world. Whether you are a start-up, small business, national or global corporation, or a company undergoing restructuring, the Trademark Services Group can ensure that your trademarks and brands are protected.

The firm’s agents are recognized to practice before the Canadian Intellectual Property Office and the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and present regularly on topics that heighten the awareness of trademark and intellectual property in general to the business community. With more than 20 years of experience in this area, the Trademark Services Group is well equipped to assist you with a full range of trademark matters, including:

  • Conducting an in-depth trademark availability search to determine whether your trademark is available for use prior to filing your applications
  • Drafting your trademark application to ensure that it is correctly filed and monitored
  • Diarizing deadlines to ensure the timely filing of documents—a missed deadline could result in the inadvertent abandonment of the applications or deletion of your registration
  • Reviewing your product, service, packaging and promotional materials to ensure that the trademark is being properly displayed and used
  • Negotiating opposition, cancellation proceedings or settlement
  • Policing and enforcing your trademark rights and managing your trademark portfolio
  • Defending your trademarks through legal proceedings, including trademark infringement actions
CASE SUMMARIES

Over the past 150 years of practicing law, our firm has had a number of notable cases, including this landmark case involving multiple levels of appeal. RBS successfully represented a Vancouver-based energy consulting business against the Government of Ontario for trademark infringement. The decision established that public bodies can also be held liable for trademark infringement when adopting an official mark that may be confused with a prior registered trademark. Read the full case summary here.